Peanuts Can Lower Cholesterol

Peanuts Can Lower Cholesterol.

I couldn’t help myself.  I had to pull out my 3 pound can of peanuts.  I felt my cholesterol levels getting too high, so I needed a peanut fix.

Researchers from California and Spain combined the data from 25 nut consumption trials conducted in seven countries among 583 men and women, and concluded that regular peanut consumption improved cholesterol levels and contributed to heart health.  (I love those guys!)

People with higher levels of ‘bad’ LDL cholesterol and triglycerides (blood fats) and those consuming poorer quality diets gained the most benefits from regular nut consumption, the researchers said.

Looking at the data in all the studies, the researchers found that those consuming nuts frequently – equivalent of two small handfuls – reduced total cholesterol by 5.1% and LDL cholesterol by 7.4%. Their ratio of LDL to ‘good’ HDL cholesterol also changed by 8.3% in a favourable direction.

Lead investigator for the study published in Archives of Internal Medicine, Dr Joan Sabaté from Loma Linda University, California, said: “Results of this study provide the best evidence yet that eating nuts reduces LDL cholesterol and improves the blood lipids profile. The findings from this analysis support those from epidemiological studies, which have consistently shown that habitual nut consumption reduces the risk of heart disease. A simple change of eating nuts regularly can make a big difference in people’s health.”

The study was published in the 10 May issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, a journal of the American Medical Association.

Source: American Peanut Council

  • Peanuts contain high levels of Niacin Vitamin B3.
    Niacin is a natural cholesterol lowering agent that, alone, has been shown to outperform prescriptive drugs in mild and even moderate cases. It helps your body to work on the cellular level and increases the health of the digestive system, improves circulation, promotes healthy skin and the sound functioning of your nervous system.

    According to Jane Higdon PhD of the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University,
    ‘Pharmacological doses of nicotinic acid, but not nicotinamide, have been known to reduce serum cholesterol since 1955. Only one randomized placebo-controlled
    multicenter trial examined the effect of nicotinic acid therapy alone (3 grams daily) on outcomes of cardiovascular disease. The Coronary Drug Project (CDP) followed over 8,000 men with a previous myocardial infarction (heart attack) for 6 years. In the group that took 3 grams of nicotinic acid daily, total blood cholesterol decreased by an average of 10%, triglycerides decreased by 26%, recurrent nonfatal myocardial infarction decreased by 27%, and cerebrovascular events (stroke + transient ischemic attacks) decreased by 26% compared to the placebo group.’

    Sources
    Niacin and niacinamide are found in beef liver, brewer’s yeast, broccoli, carrots, cheese, corn flour, dates, eggs, fish, milk, peanuts, pork, potatoes, tomatoes, wheat germ, and whole wheat products.

  • Peanuts contain high levels of Niacin Vitamin B3.
    Niacin is a natural cholesterol lowering agent that, alone, has been shown to outperform prescriptive drugs in mild and even moderate cases. It helps your body to work on the cellular level and increases the health of the digestive system, improves circulation, promotes healthy skin and the sound functioning of your nervous system.

    According to Jane Higdon PhD of the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University,
    ‘Pharmacological doses of nicotinic acid, but not nicotinamide, have been known to reduce serum cholesterol since 1955. Only one randomized placebo-controlled
    multicenter trial examined the effect of nicotinic acid therapy alone (3 grams daily) on outcomes of cardiovascular disease. The Coronary Drug Project (CDP) followed over 8,000 men with a previous myocardial infarction (heart attack) for 6 years. In the group that took 3 grams of nicotinic acid daily, total blood cholesterol decreased by an average of 10%, triglycerides decreased by 26%, recurrent nonfatal myocardial infarction decreased by 27%, and cerebrovascular events (stroke + transient ischemic attacks) decreased by 26% compared to the placebo group.’

    Sources
    Niacin and niacinamide are found in beef liver, brewer’s yeast, broccoli, carrots, cheese, corn flour, dates, eggs, fish, milk, peanuts, pork, potatoes, tomatoes, wheat germ, and whole wheat products.